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A Valentine's Day Blog Post: Weeds With Pretty Names (Re-Posted)

Field Bindweed

You just KNOW that some plants are considered weeds. Their common names give them away. They sound awful. Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Ripgut brome (Bromus diandrus). Devil's claw (Proboscidea lutea). Smellmelon (Cucumis melo). Itchgrass (Rottboellia cochinchinensis)....

Posted on Thursday, February 14, 2019 at 10:11 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture Pest Management

See Bugs, Bees and Nematodes on UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day

A six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture, Miss Beehaven, anchors the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. It is the work of Donna Billick of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's going to be a long weekend, but it's a short one when you consider all the things you can do and see at the eighth annual UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day on Saturday, Feb. 16. Bring your family. Bring your friends. Bring your camera. The science-based event, free and family friendly, begins...

A six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture, Miss Beehaven, anchors the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. It is the work of Donna Billick of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture, Miss Beehaven, anchors the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. It is the work of Donna Billick of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture, Miss Beehaven, anchors the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. It is the work of Donna Billick of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A colorful--and viable--bee hive at the  Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. Bees don't usually fly until the temperature hits 55 degrees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A colorful--and viable--bee hive at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. Bees don't usually fly until the temperature hits 55 degrees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A colorful--and viable--bee hive at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. Bees don't usually fly until the temperature hits 55 degrees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis nematologist and graduate student Christopher Pagan (center) greets visitors at a UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis nematologist and graduate student Christopher Pagan (center) greets visitors at a UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis nematologist and graduate student Christopher Pagan (center) greets visitors at a UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterflies are a popular attraction at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Butterflies are a popular attraction at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterflies are a popular attraction at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At the Bohart Museum of Entomology, visitors can hold the stick insects. This is a black velvet walking stick with red wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
At the Bohart Museum of Entomology, visitors can hold the stick insects. This is a black velvet walking stick with red wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At the Bohart Museum of Entomology, visitors can hold the stick insects. This is a black velvet walking stick with red wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tsetse Flies: Who Knew?

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Did you read the article in today's New York Times about tsetse flies and the scientists who research them? Totally fascinating. Tsetse fly expert Geoffrey Attardo, a medical entomologist and assistant professor with  the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, drew the attention...

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)
Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office in Briggs Hall, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office in Briggs Hall, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office in Briggs Hall, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Citrus: Preserve it now to serve it safely later

Sue Mosbacher prepares fruit for canning.

Winter is the time when many backyard citrus trees and roadside fruit stands are laden with mandarins, lemons, navel oranges and limes. A UC Cooperative Extension expert is traveling the state to teach how the fresh taste of citrus can be preserved for year-round enjoyment.

UC Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver coordinator Sue Mosbacher recently taught a roomful of attentive Mariposa County residents how to safely make marmalade jam, preserve lemons in salt to add flavor to savory dishes, and can grapefruit and orange sections with a little sugar to produce a fresh-tasting citrus cocktail high in vitamin C.

Mosbacher is a community education specialist based in El Dorado and Sacramento counties. But she has been driving up and down Highway 99 to bring research-based food preservation lessons to residents as far south as Madera County as part of a special project that was funded with a $140,000 specialty crops block grant from the California Department of Food and Agriculture.

Mosbacher has made dozens of appearances at county fairs and community meetings.

“It's been fabulous,” Mosbacher said. “People want the information and are using what they are learning.”

The series began last year with lessons focused on preserving summer fruit. The citrus classes are being offered in the winter. And in late spring 2019, Mosbacher will be on the road again to teach more fruit preservation classes and, in summer and fall of 2019, she will offer vegetable preservation lessons. The project is slated to conclude in 2020.

Master Food Preserver Barbara Mattice, left, helped Mosbacher demonstrate citrus preservation in class.

Mosbacher said she is energized for this journey by knowing that she is making a difference in California communities. She shared a telling story from a Georgetown vegetable preservation class. A participant said she had canned peas using the boiling water method; the Master Food Preserver Program guidelines require the use of a pressure canner for low-acid vegetables to prevent the growth of bacteria that produce the botulism toxin.

“She said she always canned peas in a water bath, and no one had ever died. But she came back the next week and told us she decided not to risk it and to throw the veggies to her chickens,” Mosbacher said. “And the next day, half her chickens died.”

Mosbacher has a background in computer science and the financial industry. During the 2008 downturn, she was laid off and spent time as a 4-H volunteer in the UC Cooperative Extension Office. While there, she learned about a part-time job opportunity working with UC Master Gardeners and UC Master Food Preservers.

At the time, she had no food preservation experience, so she took Master Food Preserver training.

“I learned everything I know from our own Master Food Preservers,” Mosbacher said.

Most citrus fruit is ready for harvest in the winter. It can be preserved a variety of ways to enjoy it year round.

Master Food Preservers are volunteer food preservation enthusiasts who have been trained in research-based preservation methods. Every food preserver training begins with a food safety primer with proven methods to decontaminate kitchen surfaces and tools, detoxify canned low-acid food and guard against spoilage.

At the citrus training, Mosbacher demonstrated canning a delicious orange jelly spiced with cinnamon, allspice and cloves. After cooking the juice with sugar and pectin, she canned the jelly using the boiling water method and with a steam canner. Either option is okay with high-acid citrus fruit.

Options for preserving lemons abounded. The juice can be frozen in an egg carton or ice cube tray, and used throughout the year in salad dressings, fruit salads, soups and ice cream. Slices of lemon can be dried to flavor ice water, seafood and casseroles. Mosbacher demonstrated preserving lemon wedges in salt water seasoned with bay leaves, cinnamon sticks and whole black peppercorns. She provided a recipe for a gourmet chicken tagine and roasted fingerling potatoes with preserved lemons to give participants guidance for using their preserved fruit.

At all the classes, participants are surveyed at the beginning and end to document the impact of the training. The preliminary results calculated with responses from 75 participants reflect positive results. After the class, nearly half of participants intended to preserve more fruit at home than they previously preserved. Two-thirds of participants intended to dehydrate more fruit than before. 

"The results are great," said Katie Johnson, UC Cooperative Extension nutrition, family and consumer sciences advisor in the Central Sierra. "We never see results this high with regard to health behaviors, so I think it's pretty exciting."

To learn about food preservation programs around the state and search for classes, visit the UC Master Food Preserver website. 

Canned wedges of grapefruit and oranges.

 

Lemon zest and coarse salt can be combined to make a long-lasting seasoning for fish, salads and other foods.
 
Class participants tasted spiced orange jelly, lemon curd and orange marmalade.
 
Citrus may be canned in many ways, include jellies and marmalades, pickled and candied.
Posted on Monday, February 11, 2019 at 8:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Food

Oh, the Butterflies You'll See at the Bohart During UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, holds some of the Morpho specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, the butterflies you'll see at the Bohart Museum of Entomology during the eighth annual UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day on Saturday, Feb. 16. Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) collection, says "I believe we have half a million Lepitoptera in our...

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, holds some of the Morpho specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, holds some of the Morpho specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, who curates the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, holds some of the Morpho specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue morpho butterflies are among the
Blue morpho butterflies are among the "Wow" displays at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue morpho butterflies are among the "Wow" displays at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum has five drawers of monarch butterfly specimens. Here curator Jeff Smith shows some of them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Bohart Museum has five drawers of monarch butterfly specimens. Here curator Jeff Smith shows some of them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum has five drawers of monarch butterfly specimens. Here curator Jeff Smith shows some of them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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