UCCE Sonoma County
University of California
UCCE Sonoma County

Sexual Harassment

  1. Introduction
    UC ANR is committed to creating and maintaining a community where all persons who participate in ANR programs and activities can work together in an atmosphere free of all forms of harassment, exploitation or intimidation. Every member of the ANR community should be aware that ANR is strongly opposed to sexual harassment, and that such behavior is prohibited both by law and by ANR and University policy. ANR will respond promptly and effectively to reports of sexual harassment, and will take appropriate action to prevent, to correct and if necessary, to discipline behavior that violates this policy.
  2. Definition of Sexual Harassment
    1. Title VII of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex discrimination in federally assisted education programs and activities. Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination. Sexual harassment is defined as follows:
      1. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when:
        1. Submission to or rejection of this conduct will either explicitly or implicitly effect a person’s employment or participation in an educational program;
        2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for evaluation to making academic,  personnel or participation decisions affecting an individual; or
        3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with a person’s work or educational opportunity or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or learning environment.
    2. There are three types of sexual harassment. The first two types of sexual harassment are known as quid pro quo harassment. They include situations in which a person explicitly threatens negative consequences, or promises positive consequences, as a means of securing acquiescence to unwelcome sexual behavior.
    3. The third type of sexual harassment is known as hostile/intimidating environment harassment. Conduct that may contribute to a hostile or intimidating environment includes, but is not limited to verbal, nonverbal, and physical sexual behaviors; sexual jokes and innuendoes; remarks about a person’s body; turning discussions inappropriately to sexual topics; whistling or cat calls; looking a person up and down or staring in a sexually suggestive manner; invading a person’s personal space or blocking her/his path; sexually explicit visuals such as pin-ups; touching, hugging, massaging, and other gestures or sounds that a reasonable person of the same sex as the recipient would find offensive. Sexual harassment does not occur if the acts are isolated or trivial; they must be severe or pervasive, considered in the totality of the circumstances.
    4. It is important to note that the intentions of the alleged harasser are irrelevant in determining whether his/her behaviors constitute sexual harassment; it is the effect of the behavior upon the recipient or upon others affected by the conduct that defines hostile environment harassment.
  3. Sexual Harassment in the 4-H YDP
    1. Sexual harassment is not tolerated in the 4 H YDP. It is the responsibility of the 4 H YDP to provide an environment that is free from sexual harassment for all program participants.
    2. Training and other educational programs will be implemented to inform 4 H participants about sexual harassment and to prevent sexual harassment from occurring. Anyone who engages in sexual harassment will be subject to discipline appropriate to the offense and to his or her position within the 4-H YDP.
    3. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature are considered sexual harassment when:
      1. A 4-H member or adult participant is made to feel that he or she must allow sexually offensive behavior in order to receive instruction or to participate in any 4-H YDP activity;
      2. Agreeing to or not agreeing to such sexually offensive conduct by an individual is used as a basis for evaluation in making decisions affecting an individual; or
      3. Such sexually offensive conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment in the 4-H YDP.
    4. Conduct which may constitute sexual harassment includes, but is not limited to:
      1. Verbal conduct such as unwelcome sexual advances, invitations or comments;
      2. Visual conduct such as sexual posters, photography, cartoons, drawings or gestures;
      3. Physical conduct such as unwelcome touching, blocking normal movement, or interfering with performance or progress within the 4-H YDP that is directed at an individual because of sex;
      4. Threats and demands to submit to sexual requests in order to receive a good evaluation or other benefit, or in order to avoid some other loss, and offers of good evaluation or other benefit in return for sexual favors; and/or
      5. Retaliation for having reported or threatened to report sexual harassment.
    5. In determining whether the alleged conduct constitutes sexual harassment, consideration shall be given to the record of the incident as a whole and to all of the circumstances, including the context in which the alleged incidents occurred.
    6. In the 4 H YDP, the targets of sexual harassment may be male or female, youth or adult, volunteer or employee. The initiator may be a male or female, youth or adult or volunteer or employee. Residents at a home where 4 H meetings or events are held, speakers and facilitators at 4 H conferences and events, vendors, or any other person who is participating in any way in a 4 H activity may also be initiators. The victim may be the object of the behavior or an observer of an interaction that results in limiting the ability of the observer to fully participate in or benefit from the program.

 

What this means to our volunteers…

All volunteers should be aware that ANR is strongly opposed to sexual harassment, and that such behavior is prohibited both by law and by ANR and University policy. See definition above.

University of California Cooperative Extension, Sonoma County
133 Aviation Blvd Suite 109, Santa Rosa, CA 95403  Phone: 707.565.2621  Fax: 707.565.2623
Office Hours:  M-F, 8am-Noon & 1pm-4pm

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