UCCE Sonoma County
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Posts Tagged: rangeland

Carbon Sequestration on Rangelands: Addressing Climate Change

Fig 1: Loren Poncia checking sugar levels of grass

Carbon is the energy currency of most biological systems, including agricultural ecosystems. All agricultural production originates from the process of plant photosynthesis, which uses sunshine to combine carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air with water and...

Posted on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 at 1:27 PM
Tags: carbon (1), greenhouse (1), rangeland (13)

Conservation Easement Payment Structures: Lump Sums, Annuities, and Payments for Ecosystems Services

Beef cattle photo by Sheila Barry

Rangeland owners in the Bay Area face substantial pressure to develop their land.  The short term financial gains from developing rangeland for vineyards or residential construction can be very large.  In Sonoma and Marin Counties several...

Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 1:27 PM
Tags: ecosystem services (1), PES (1), rangeland (13)

Impact of Grazing on Endangered Species

Cattle on rangeland

Through the 1980's, 1990's, and into the early 2000's, efforts to conserve threatened and endangered (special status) species on western rangelands often meant removing livestock ranching.  Research findings, demonstration results, and failed...

Posted on Monday, November 7, 2016 at 2:25 PM
Tags: Biodiversity (1), Rangeland (13)

Coping with Drought on California Rangelands Publication

Announcement reprinted from California Wool Growers' Association newsletter. I was part of the team and it reflects input from Mendocino and Lake County ranchers as well as the rest of the state.

 

California has experienced five large-scale, multiyear droughts since 1960; however, the current event is considered the state's most severe drought in at least 500 years. Each year of the current drought has presented different challenges; for example, much of California received no measurable precipitation December 2013 through late January 2014. In the following year, the Sierra Nevada snowpack was just 5% of normal. As California ranching is largely dependent on rain-fed systems, as opposed to groundwater or stored water, it is very vulnerable to drought. In fact, rangeland livestock ranchers were among the first affected by the abnormally warm, dry winters at the beginning of the current multiyear drought.

 

In this article, we highlight lessons learned so far from past droughts, as well as California's unprecedented and ongoing multiyear drought. We draw on ranchers' perspectives and experiences, including research results from a statewide mail survey of 507 ranchers and semistructured interviews of 102 ranchers, as well as our own experiences. The mail survey (the California Rangeland Decision-Making Survey) included questions on operator and operation demographics, goals and practices, information resources, and rancher perspectives. Semistructured interviews are part of a larger ongoing project (the California Ranch Stewardship Project) examining rangeland management for multiple ecosystem services.

 

The publication is available at the following link - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019005281630027X

 

 

Posted on Friday, September 16, 2016 at 2:59 PM
Tags: 5-year drought (1), cattle (1), drought (1), drought strategies (1), goats (3), rangeland (13), sheep (3)

University of California Cooperative Extension Wild Pig Survey

In managed rangelands and agricultural areas, feral or wild pigs are a significant pest species. However, estimates of total damaged area occurring on these lands are ill-defined and subject to a high degree of variability. Wild pigs can be important vectors of disease, can cause forage and crop loss and set up sites for erosion effecting water quality and allow

Wild pigs at HREC
invasive plant species to establish. They can also prey on livestock. The geographical extent of wild pig damage in California is currently unknown making it difficult to mitigate and manage losses, and estimate the economic impact on private landowners and public lands.

UCCE Livestock and Range Advisors and Wildlife Specialists need your help by filling out a short statewide survey on wild pig damage found at: http://ucanr.edu/survey/survey.cfm?surveynumber=16522. It should only take about 15 minutes to complete. Individual identities and survey responses will be kept confidential. Participation in the survey is entirely voluntary.

In conjunction with the survey we have developed a smart phone or tablet app that will help landowners and managers identify and record feral pig damage so that we can estimate the land area and economic impacts of feral pig damage over a longer time period. If you are interested in participating in data collection using our mobile application, please fill out the survey and indicate your interest at the end.

If you have questions about the survey or would like a paper copy, please contact either UCCE Livestock & Natural Resources Advisor, John Harper, at 707-463-4495 or jmharper@ucanr.edu or UCCE Wildlife Specialist, Roger Baldwin, at (530) 752-4551 or rabaldwin@ucdavis.edu.

Posted on Friday, August 12, 2016 at 3:18 PM
Tags: feral hogs (1), feral pigs (1), orchards (1), rangeland (13), vineyards (1), Wild pigs (1)

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