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Posts Tagged: olive

Her Name Was Olive

Olive attentively watches for Kris Kolb. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Her name was Olive. Every Friday morning she'd come bounding over to greet me, her tail wagging happily, one ear up, one ear down. I called her "My Second Favorite Dog" and nicknamed her "The Bee Garden Mascot." Her owner, Kristen Kolb of Davis, was one of the 19 founding gardeners who tended...

Olive attentively watches for Kris Kolb. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Olive attentively watches for Kris Kolb. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olive attentively watches for Kris Kolb. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sarah Hodge pets Olive, while Kris Kolb gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sarah Hodge pets Olive, while Kris Kolb gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sarah Hodge pets Olive, while Kris Kolb gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olive faithfully follows Kris Kolb as she hauls away clippings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Olive faithfully follows Kris Kolb as she hauls away clippings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olive faithfully follows Kris Kolb as she hauls away clippings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, December 20, 2013 at 10:14 PM

Rain has painted California rangeland green

Steady rain so far this fall has produced a verdant emerald green panorama on California rangeland, reported Capital Press this week.

Livestock producers are elated, said Josh Davy, a UC Cooperative Extension advisor in Tehama County.

"It's been nice to start the year with some big rains because it fills up the reservoirs, puts some drinking water out there and it helps build deeper soil moisture in case it doesn't rain later," Davy said. "We hope it keeps going until March."

The 2012 rainy autumn has helped much of Northern California emerge from drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Parts of the southern San Joaquin Valley are still in severe drought, but conditions have shown some improvement.

UC Davis olive center to look at ways to reduce wastewater
Melanie Turner, Sacramento Business Journal

The UC Davis Olive Center and USDA-Agricultural Research Service have been awarded a grant to develop innovative ways to reduce the amount of wastewater produced by the olive oil industry. Among the technologies to be evaluated is a “vibrating membrane system” patented by New Logic Research of Emeryville. The company will be providing the system for testing at no cost.

Posted on Wednesday, December 19, 2012 at 9:48 AM
Tags: drought (202), Josh Davy (5), olive (8), rangeland (56)

Garden writer streams advice on toxic plants

In a 1,500-word stream of consciousness, Bakersfield Magazine gardening writer Lynn Pitts warned her readers about the dangers of certain "toxic plants."

Sprinkled among personal experiences, trivia and witticisms, Pitts presented the 10 most common toxic plants found in local gardens: Oleander, tomatoes, potatoes, rhubarb, delphinium, boxwood, pyracantha, fig, foxglove and castor bean.

Among her words of wisdom:

  • Oleander cuttings shouldn't be disposed of in green waste cans.
  • Almost everything on tomato and potato plants are poisonous, expect the tomato and potato.
  • Rhubarb leaves are toxic.
  • The leaves and sap of fig trees cause dermatitis.
  • Foxglove is the source of the heart medicine digitalis.
  • Nefarious people have concocted the poison “ricin” from castor bean.

UC Cooperative Extension enters the story in a tangent close to the end, when Pitts writes about a time a wind storm left she and a neighbor flush with fresh olives. Pitts says she called the local University of California Cooperative Extension office for information on home olive curing.

"It wasn’t difficult, but time consuming; changing the brine constantly, rinsing, re-brining over and over. After the last brining, we packed them with fresh herbs and olive oil into sterilized glass canning jars," Pitts wrote. "We thought we’d have plenty of jars to give away as gifts, but, honestly, we ate most of them ourselves!"

Garden writer steers readers to UCCE for olive curing advice.
Garden writer steers readers to UCCE for olive curing advice.

Posted on Thursday, June 30, 2011 at 9:05 AM
Tags: olive (8), toxic plants (1)

Olive trees to be added to ag assessment program

The California Senate Agriculture Committee has approved a bill that would add oil olive trees to the list of crops that are subject to a 1 percent state levy, according to a statement released by Sen. Anthony Cannella, one of the two sponsors.

The release said the bill, SB 707, will add oil olive trees in the CDFA Foundation Plant Services program at UC Davis. The service helps provide the industry access to disease-free, virus tested, and true-to-type certification for oil olive trees developed through extensive research. SB 707 also expands the membership of the Fruit Tree, Nut Tree, and Grapevine Improvement Advisory Board, which oversees the program, to include representatives of licensed olive nursery stock producers.

According to AroundtheCapitol.com, existing law imposes an annual assessment of 1 percent on the gross sales of all deciduous pome and stone fruit trees, nut trees, and grapevines, including seeds, seedlings, rootstocks, and topstock, including ornamental varieties of apple, apricot, crabapple, cherry, nectarine, peach, pear, and plum, produced and sold within the state or produced within and shipped from the state by any licensed nursery dealer, and provides that for packaged or containerized stock.

The new bill would include olive trees within the plants that are subject to the assessment.

Cannella's news release said another bill, SB 515, also passed by a unanimous committee vote. SB 513 would reinstate pre-existing, self-imposed industry fees that help ensure the safe and proper disposal of animal by-products, as well as to prevent the theft of kitchen grease.

“Agriculture is a $35 billion industry in California, and it’s important that we work together to ensure consumers can buy our state’s home-grown products with confidence,” Cannella is quoted. “I’m pleased to have earned the committee’s support for these two bills, and I remain committed to working with all interested parties to ensure these bills are approved by the Legislature.”

Posted on Wednesday, May 4, 2011 at 9:32 AM
Tags: assessment (2), levy (1), olive (8)

Olive harvest underway in Sonoma

The Sonoma Press-Democrat ran a brief story today about the beginning of the olive harvest in the Northern California County better known for vineyards. Although olive production in the area is no match in size for the long-established grape industry, the crop's novelty and quality attract attention.

“There are about 600 acres and 150 growers,” the story quoted Paul Vossen, UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor in Sonoma County. By comparison, the county boasts 60,000 acres of vineyards.

Vossen, an internationally recognized olive oil expert, has posted extensive information on California and international olive oil production and sensory evaluation on his Web site.

Paul Vossen
Paul Vossen

Posted on Thursday, November 19, 2009 at 9:26 AM
Tags: olive (8), olive oil (24), Paul Vossen (16)

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