UCCE Sonoma County
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UCCE Sonoma County

Posts Tagged: bear

Living with Wildlife – Outcomes and actions following the recent workshop at UC ANR Hopland REC

submitted by Hopland REC Director, Dr. Kim Rodrigues

Since arriving as the Director for HREC in 2013-2014, I have been committed to protecting all of the amazing resources here at the Hopland Research and Extension Center (HREC,) with a dedicated effort to saving wildlife and reducing losses of sheep.  As one of the last remaining sheep research facilities and one of the largest flocks in our immediate area, the sheep are prey to coyotes and other potential predators on the landscape. 

IMG 5223 (2)

With increasing numbers of wildlife across the region, state and nation, conflicts between humans and wildlife are increasing.  Our workshop at HREC on August 31, 2017 focused on living with wildlife while managing livestock, with an overarching goal to seek a shared understanding of non-lethal tools through research, implementation and education.

Over 80 participants from a diversity of backgrounds including researchers, ranchers, community members and non-profits attended. All participants experienced demonstrations of several non-lethal tools, including some exciting applications of scary devices, such as Halloween decorations, collars to protect sheep with strobe lights and canine avoidance noises built into them, fencing with an electric charge, lion proof pens and flagging attached to deter movement across the fencing and more.  Many participants wanted more hands-on field time with the ranchers using these tools and HREC is working to develop this for late spring/early summer of 2018.

We explored new and emerging research with Dr. Brashares and his team only to learn that it “depends.”  Everything is situational and place-based and this is a key lesson or outcome from the meeting.  The situational questions asked of each rancher on the panel may help inform the choice of tools and the mix of tools to reduce losses.

IMG 5219 (2)

We learned that there are practical barriers – such as time, money and labor, as well as scientific barriers to fully implementing non-lethal tools.  Yet, one common message was to mix and match tools and vary them frequently.  “Match” the tools to your specific situation(s) and mix them up over time and space frequently.   Many creative ideas came up to help share tools and other resources and the concept of a lending library with non-lethal tools available to ranchers emerged as a local action HREC will explore further with our community partners.

We understand the importance of strong working relationships and diverse partnerships and we will work with the participants who were able to attend and outreach to partners, such as local agricultural commissioner and staff, California Department of Fish and Wildlife and Wildlife Services to ensure we are all working together. 

We learned from and valued the diverse perspectives and there was a tremendous sense of respect for all people present that allowed a dynamic and safe learning environment.

Already, HREC is moving forward with new research to better track and document the work of our large guard dogs (LGDs) as a tool to prevent losses of livestock. The concept of putting GPS collars on our dogs and tracking their movements over a variety of pasture types and sizes and landscapes is already being discussed and outlined by HREC staff and research colleagues. It is recognized that LGDs can and do kill wildlife, so they are not truly a “non-lethal” tool yet they remain one of the most important tools livestock managers rely on to protect their animals.  Lethal controls are still used in combination with non-lethal tools – snares, calling, shooting – in most ranching situations but not all.  Yet all ranchers shared their goals to reduce losses of both livestock and wildlife and agreed that preventing losses is the best approach in all cases.

I welcome you to visit our HREC site and you can review the amazing graphic art that captured the essence of the workshop, as well as the rancher panel interviews, the presentations and more online.  Please join us for future events.

Together, we may find innovative tools and solutions and keep ranching viable in our communities to prevent further fragmentation and conversion to other uses, saving both livestock and wildlife.

Posted on Friday, September 8, 2017 at 11:09 AM

HREC August Newsletter now available!

A little late in the month, but here is our August newsletter! 

http://us10.campaign-archive2.com/?u=32b1d74684fe8cfb160cb78a8&id=8ad396ce85&e=[UNIQID]

And more about our upcoming "Hopland Hikes" event:

"Over 5,300 acres of oak woodland, chaparral and rangeland will be opened up on Saturday, September 12th from 10am-12pm for a guided public hike at the Hopland Research and Extension Center. Dr. Kim Rodrigues the Center Director will guide visitors on a 2 hour hike and share some of the exciting  research and education activities, how the public can get involved at the site and where bears like to bathe!

This black bear has been captured on trail camera, enjoying a break in one of the water troughs at HREC, during a study conducted by Dr. Justin Brashares which examines how wildlife movement is affected by fencing.

“The Hopland Research and Extension Center (HREC) is one of 9 centers across the state owned by the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources division. This is a great opportunity for the public to visit the site and learn about the important research that has been conducted here over the last 60 years. Research projects have encompassed many different disciplines ranging from Dr. Bob Lane's groundbreaking research into Lyme disease and other tick borne diseases to Dr. Donna Gillette's work on ancient petroglyph style markings on the site, found to be over 5000 years old! This is a great opportunity for the public to visit this beautiful property, we are also hoping to build a community of docents to help run these hikes on a monthly basis in 2016. There is so much to see on the site we can't cover it all in just one hike!” Commented Hannah Bird, Community Educator at HREC.

Participants are encouraged to wear clothing suitable for hiking whatever the weather and to bring a water bottle. Hikes will take place on roads or trails – but terrain may be steep and uneven at times. No dogs are allowed on the hike due to the presence of guard animals on the site used for sheep protection.

Those who would like to share a potluck lunch after the hike are encouraged to bring along plates, utensils, cups and an item of food to share.

This is a free event but participants are encouraged to sign up in advance at: http://ow.ly/R9BJo . Hikers will meet at the Rod Shippey Hall, 4070 University Road, Hopland CA 95449 at 10am on Saturday, September 12th. For more information contact Hannah Bird, (707) 744-1424, Ext. 105, hbird@ucanr.edu

Posted on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 at 8:04 AM
Tags: bear (3), hiking (1), Hopland (1), research (1), UCANR (1)

Drought is a scapegoat for wildlife in urban areas

Mountain lions' range is the greatest of any large wild terrestrial mammal in the Western Hemisphere. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)
The California drought is being blamed for increased sightings of wild animals in urban areas, a situation for which humans are more likely responsible, reported Haya El Nasser on Al Jazeera America.

The story said a bear recently wandered into a Little League baseball game in San Luis Obispo and mountain lions are jumping fences in Northern California to kill goats. Experts said the sightings might be unusual, but not abnormal.

For decades, the article said, sprawling development into natural habitats has brought wild animals face to face with humans.

“In many cases, resources along the edge of the suburbs are far more reliable than resources out in the wild, because every year people are going to irrigate their fruit trees. Every year they're going to irrigate their lawns,” said Tom Scott, University of California Cooperative Extension specialist. “Animals are quick to use resources that are available.”

Scott said the drought is taking a toll on wildlife reproduction.

“This is the third year of drought, and that's three bad years of reproduction for wildlife species,” he said. “Wildlife population is starting to decline. It's attrition rather than a catastrophic drop, but if we went through another drought year, who knows?”

Posted on Thursday, June 5, 2014 at 11:03 AM
Tags: bear (3), drought (1), mountain lion (1), Tom Scott (1), wildlife (2)
 
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