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Posts Tagged: UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program

Redhumped Caterpillar: Aptly Named

Redhumped caterpillars on a Western redbud tree in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How appropriate are many of the common names of insects! Take the immature form (caterpillar) of the moth, Schizura concinna, family Notodontidae.  We first spotted this caterpillar on our Western redbud tree (Cercis occidentalis) in September 2010. It has a red hump. The common name: The...

What This Katydid Did...

Who goes there? That would be a katydid peeking out between yellow rose petals. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's not a question of whether katydid did or didn't. She did. In answer to what-are-we-going-to-see-next-in-insect-sightings-today-in-our-weird-climate-changing patterns, a katydid  appeared on our yellow rose bush on Nov. 21 in Vacaville, Calif. And stayed for several days. Usually,...

Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at 5:33 PM

Ladybug, Ladybug, Fly Away Home!

A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised  for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybug!  Ladybug!Fly away home.Your house is on fireAnd your children are gone. How many times have you heard that nursery rhyme? Better yet, how many times have you seen a lady beetle (because they're beetles, not bugs) take off? Look closely for lady beetles in aphid-infested milkweed...

Posted on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 5:00 PM

An Insect Assembled by a Committee?

A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is an insect that looks as if it were assembled by a dysfunctional committee: long angular legs,  long antennae, and beady eyes on a thin green body. All hail the katydid. It's usually camouflaged, disguised as a leaf in the vegetation--Nature's gift. But in our pollinator garden, we...

Posted on Friday, June 2, 2017 at 5:15 PM

Can Lady Beetle Larvae Eat Aphids?

Close-up of a lady beetle larva eating an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can the larvae of lady beetles (aka ladybugs) eat aphids? Yes, they can.  And yes, they do. We spotted some lady beetle larvae on our yellow roses today and guess what they were doing? Right, eating aphids. Eating lots of aphids. The larvae look a little like miniature alligators, which is...

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