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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Hungry, Hungry Caterpillars!

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It starts out slow. Beginning in the spring (and sometimes year-around in some locales) Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) lay their eggs on their host plant, the passionflower vine (Passiflora). They deposit their eggs on the tendrils, on the leaves, and sometimes on the fence, wall or door...

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oct. 19th Seminar at UC Davis: Do Butterflies Dream of Genetic Tattoos?

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Do butterflies dream of genetic tattoos? That's part of the creative title of a seminar that Arnaud Martin, assistant professor of biology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, will deliver next week to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Martin, an evolutionary...

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)
Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

'Honey, I Hardly Know Ya!' The UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center Can Change That!

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Honey, I hardly know ya!" The UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center can change that! Want to learn more about the product that honey bees make? The UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center is offering a Sensory Evaluation of Honey Certificate Course, Oct. 26-28 in the Mondavi Institute's...

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Targeting the Tsetse Fly

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

He targets the tsetse fly. Tsetse flies, large biting flies that inhabit much of Africa, feed on the blood of humans and other vertebrates and transmit such parasitic diseases as African trypanosomiasis. In humans, this disease is better known as sleeping sickness. In 2009, after continued...

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Science Café: Ask a Scientist a Question, Such as 'Are There Upper Limits to Human Lifespan?'

Many senior citizens who develop new hobbies (such as rearing monarch butterflies) believe this keeps their brain active and leads to greater enthusiasm for life. Supercentarian Jeanne Calment of France lived to be 122. One of her interests was playing the piano. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've ever wanted to ask a scientist a question, here's your opportunity. Ask away at the Science Café. This is an informative scientific presentation held the second Wednesday of each month in the G St. Wunderbar, 228 G St., Davis. The scientist delivers a brief talk and then engages...

Many senior citizens who develop new hobbies (such as rearing monarch butterflies) believe this keeps their brain active and leads to greater enthusiasm for life. Supercentarian Jeanne Calment of France lived to be 122. One of her interests was playing the piano. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Many senior citizens who develop new hobbies (such as rearing monarch butterflies) believe this keeps their brain active and leads to greater enthusiasm for life. Supercentarian Jeanne Calment of France lived to be 122. One of her interests was playing the piano. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Many senior citizens who develop new hobbies (such as rearing monarch butterflies) believe this keeps their brain active and leads to greater enthusiasm for life. Supercentarian Jeanne Calment of France lived to be 122. One of her interests was playing the piano. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Health Innovation

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