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Posts Tagged: UC Cooperative Extension

Ag Award Recipient Rachael Freeman Long: A UC Davis Professor Sparked Her Interest in Biocontrol

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her  family farm in Yolo County in  April of 2015.

Rachael Freeman Long treasures her memories as a graduate student in entomology at the University of California, Davis. She remembers eating fried grasshoppers at a party. "They're okay with a lot of spices!" She remembers watching Professor Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. and his wife, Ruth, give one...

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her  family farm in Yolo County in  April of 2015.
Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her family farm in Yolo County in April of 2015. "Hedgerows are important for enhancing beneficial insects, including bees and natural enemies, for better biocontrol and crop pollination in adjacent field crops, with measurable economic benefits," she says. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her family farm in Yolo County in April of 2015. "Hedgerows are important for enhancing beneficial insects, including bees and natural enemies, for better biocontrol and crop pollination in adjacent field crops, with measurable economic benefits," she says. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Do You Know What's In a Hedgerow?

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, devouring an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you like to see lady beetles devouring aphids or assassin bugs piercing spotted cucumber beetles, then you'll love the workshop taking place Saturday, April 11 in rural Zamora, Yolo County. That's not to say you'll see beneficial insects doing their thing—but you might. The event, a walk...

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, devouring an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle, aka ladybug, devouring an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, devouring an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug, a beneficial insect, targeting a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An assassin bug, a beneficial insect, targeting a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug, a beneficial insect, targeting a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A green lacewing looking for love. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A green lacewing looking for love. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A green lacewing looking for love. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 8:50 PM

Public comment on UCCE positions closes July 21

Public comment on UCCE positions closes July 21

UCCE advisor Chuck Ingels, right, discusses tree pests. UC seeks comments on proposed UCCE positions.
The University of California is considering 123 UC Cooperative Extension positions that have been proposed for recruitment. Members of the public are invited to voice their thoughts on which UCCE advisor and UCCE specialist positions are higher priority. The period for public comment closes July 21. 

UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources leaders strongly encourage commodity groups, cooperating programs, agency partners, community groups and others to share their opinions on priority needs for UCCE positions.

“We want to hear from our stakeholders,” said Barbara Allen-Diaz, UC vice president for Agriculture and Natural Resources. “Which Cooperative Extension positions do you think are most critical for UC to fill with the resources we have to invest?”

Members of the public are invited to review proposed positions and leave comments at http://ucanr.edu/2014CallforPositions.

To comment on a proposal, visit http://ucanr.edu/2014CallforPositions and find the position at the bottom of the page. Above the list there is a search tool. Click the proposal title link and write in the “comments” text box. If desired, commenters may include their title and the name of their organization.

Comments are not being counted as votes. One collective set of thoughtful comments from an organization or group that explain why a position is important will carry more weight than an overwhelming number of comments that simply state support. The comments are publicly accessible and will be read by the review teams, UC ANR Program Council and Allen-Diaz.

 

Posted on Tuesday, July 8, 2014 at 2:22 PM

UC Cooperative Extension positions to connect research, community

Two UC Cooperative Extension specialists will be based at the UC campus in Merced
Two UC Cooperative Extension specialists are being deployed to UC Merced to take advantage of its location at the center of California agriculture and build on ongoing research into agriculturally significant matters related to climate, food security and nutrition.

The two UCCE specialists, from the UC Division of Agricultural and Natural Resources, will help further connect campus research with local farmers and residents.

One of the positions, which will be housed in the Sierra Nevada Research Institute, will help farmers and ranchers adjust to the problems created by climate change and participate in statewide efforts, which include state and federal agencies in addition to UC, address climate change adaptation and mitigation.

The other position, housed in the Health Sciences Research Institute, will focus on nutrition research and education and food security, aiming to improve the lives of local residents. The UCCE nutrition specialist will connect with a larger team of nutrition researchers and educators throughout the UC system addressing issues related to healthy food and human health.

UC Merced Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Tom Peterson said even though the campus doesn't have an agriculture school, current areas of faculty research can and do benefit San Joaquin Valley citizens and farmers. For example, research on unmanned aerial vehicles offers more efficient means to monitor soil and crop conditions. UC Merced scientists are also conducting research into factors that affect the flow of water out of the Sierra Nevada and into the San Joaquin Valley.

“These positions come with a focus on interacting with the community, conducting applied research, and translating UC research to help the agricultural economy and local residents,” he said. “This is a recognition that we're making important contributions to the agricultural industry and that we have research and outreach important to it.”

Both positions require applicants with Ph.D.s who are ready to start projects that will work toward solving pressing problems. 

The climate change specialist could potentially study precision technologies that help better manage agricultural systems or increase the quality and scale of information.

The nutrition specialist will work with experts in the field to understand regional and state research needs and outreach priorities. The specialist will also have an emphasis on nutrition and disease prevention.

“We're an ideal lab for these kinds of research experiments,” Peterson said.

“Serving California agriculture with UC science-based solutions is what we do on an everyday basis. California agriculture is a world-recognized marvel, and we'd like to think the university, through its Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, is a big reason why,” said Barbara Allen-Diaz, Vice President of ANR. “This collaboration with UC Merced will only strengthen UC efforts.”

ANR focuses on agriculture, nutrition, natural resources and youth development. UC Cooperative Extension, which is part of ANR, conducts research on campuses, at research and extension centers and in counties.

UCCE advisors and educators work directly with people in their communities to conduct and apply this science-based research on the farm and field and in classrooms and homes. UCCE's 20,000 Master Gardener Program and 4-H Youth Development Program volunteers help extend UC's information even further into communities around the state. 

Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at 9:59 AM
  • Author: Scott Hernandez-Jason

Public comment invited for new UCCE jobs

Cheryl Wilen, UC Cooperative Extension advisor, monitors hibiscus for giant whiteflies.
The University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources is considering 123 proposals for new UC Cooperative Extension positions. Due to resource constraints, only the highest priority positions will be selected for recruitment. Members of the public are invited to review the list of positions and offer comments to help UC ANR leadership decide which are most critical.

Public comments will be accepted until July 21.

“Filling critical academic positions is a top priority for UC ANR,” said Barbara Allen-Diaz, UC vice president for agriculture and natural resources. “We encourage our stakeholders – including commodity groups, cooperating programs, agency partners, community groups and others – to let us know what they see as priority needs for positions.”

To view the list of academic positions and to post a comment, visit http://ucanr.edu/callforpositions.

Posted on Monday, June 9, 2014 at 11:08 AM

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