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Posts Tagged: Bruce Hammock

Bruce Hammock: From ResearchIng Insect Science to Researching Autism and Schizophrenia

UC Davis researchers Jun Yang (right) and Sung Hee Hwang (center) with Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

 Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor at the University of California, Davis, who holds a joint appointment with the Department of Entomology and Nematology and the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, is fond of saying that "Science is full of surprises." A member of the UC Davis faculty...

UC Davis researchers Jun Yang (right) and Sung Hee Hwang (center) with Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis researchers Jun Yang (right) and Sung Hee Hwang (center) with Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis researchers Jun Yang (right) and Sung Hee Hwang (center) with Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a photo from the Kenji Hashimoto lab, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Japan, and includes some of the scientists working on the autism/schizophrenia research. In the center, front row, is  Kenji Hashimoto.  First author Ma Min, third from right, back row.  Second author Qian Ren is in the back row,  far right. Researcher Tamaki Ishima is the fourth from right, back row. (Photo courtesy of Kenji Hashimoto lab)
This is a photo from the Kenji Hashimoto lab, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Japan, and includes some of the scientists working on the autism/schizophrenia research. In the center, front row, is Kenji Hashimoto. First author Ma Min, third from right, back row. Second author Qian Ren is in the back row, far right. Researcher Tamaki Ishima is the fourth from right, back row. (Photo courtesy of Kenji Hashimoto lab)

This is a photo from the Kenji Hashimoto lab, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Japan, and includes some of the scientists working on the autism/schizophrenia research. In the center, front row, is Kenji Hashimoto. First author Ma Min, third from right, back row. Second author Qian Ren is in the back row, far right. Researcher Tamaki Ishima is the fourth from right, back row. (Photo courtesy of Kenji Hashimoto lab)

Posted on Monday, March 18, 2019 at 5:22 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Health Innovation

Bruce Hammock: From Researching Insects to Helping Humankind

An anise swallowtail caterpillar, Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And to think it all began with butterflies. From basic science to applied science. From studying insects to helping humankind. The ovarian cancer research published today in the Proceedings for the National Academy of Science (PNAS) can be traced back, in part, to a former graduate student at UC...

An anise swallowtail caterpillar, Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An anise swallowtail caterpillar, Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An anise swallowtail caterpillar, Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An anise swallowtail,Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An anise swallowtail,Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An anise swallowtail,Papilio zelicaon. UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's research on metamorphosis has led to human-focused research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Treasured Memories of 2018: Bruce Hammock Honored--and His Noted Research All Began with a Caterpillar

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's noted research on chronic pain all began at UC Berkeley when he wondered how caterpillars turn into butterflies. In this photo: two Gulf Fritillary butterfly mating, while a caterpillar munches passionflower leaves in the background. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Looking back on 2018, Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor at the University of California, treasures the memories of the Hammock lab reunion, when 100 scientists from 10 different countries gathered to honor his work, reunite, collaborate and reminisce. The distinguished professor, known for...

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's noted research on chronic pain all began at UC Berkeley when he wondered how caterpillars turn into butterflies. In this photo: two Gulf Fritillary butterfly mating, while a caterpillar munches passionflower leaves in the background. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's noted research on chronic pain all began at UC Berkeley when he wondered how caterpillars turn into butterflies. In this photo: two Gulf Fritillary butterfly mating, while a caterpillar munches passionflower leaves in the background. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock's noted research on chronic pain all began at UC Berkeley when he wondered how caterpillars turn into butterflies. In this photo: two Gulf Fritillary butterfly mating, while a caterpillar munches passionflower leaves in the background. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bruce Hammock smiles as he receives accolades. In the back is his longtime friend Sarjeet Gill, distinguished professor at UC Riverside. They co-discovered an enzyme, epoxide hydrolase during their graduate studies at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bruce Hammock smiles as he receives accolades. In the back is his longtime friend Sarjeet Gill, distinguished professor at UC Riverside. They co-discovered an enzyme, epoxide hydrolase during their graduate studies at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bruce Hammock smiles as he receives accolades. In the back is his longtime friend Sarjeet Gill, distinguished professor at UC Riverside. They co-discovered an enzyme, epoxide hydrolase during their graduate studies at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some 100 scientists (and their families) from 10 different countries converged on the UC Davis campus to honor their mentor, Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Some 100 scientists (and their families) from 10 different countries converged on the UC Davis campus to honor their mentor, Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some 100 scientists (and their families) from 10 different countries converged on the UC Davis campus to honor their mentor, Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum Halloween Party: A Night of Frights and Delights!

UC Davis entomology doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts and her husband, George, pose with their Brittany Spaniel, Westley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a night of frights and delights! The Bohart Museum Society hosted the Bohart Museum of Entomology's 24th annual pre-Halloween party on Saturday, Oct. 27 at the University of California, Davis,  billing it as “They Come From Within" and promising a “haunting night full of...

UC Davis entomology doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts and her husband, George, pose with their Brittany Spaniel, Westley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts and her husband, George, pose with their Brittany Spaniel, Westley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts and her husband, George, pose with their Brittany Spaniel, Westley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis undergraduate entomology student Karissa Merritt (right) who created the invitations, shares a laugh with doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts, who crafted her costume, inspired by  the invitation. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis undergraduate entomology student Karissa Merritt (right) who created the invitations, shares a laugh with doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts, who crafted her costume, inspired by the invitation. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis undergraduate entomology student Karissa Merritt (right) who created the invitations, shares a laugh with doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts, who crafted her costume, inspired by the invitation. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomology graduate Danielle Wishon said it took her four hours to do this make-up. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomology graduate Danielle Wishon said it took her four hours to do this make-up. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomology graduate Danielle Wishon said it took her four hours to do this make-up. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jason Bond (right) the Evert and Marion Schlinger Endowed Chair in Insect Systematics in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, chats with Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor of entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Jason Bond (right) the Evert and Marion Schlinger Endowed Chair in Insect Systematics in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, chats with Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor of entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jason Bond (right) the Evert and Marion Schlinger Endowed Chair in Insect Systematics in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, chats with Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor of entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sharing some fun are (from left) Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology; UC Davis doctoral student Zachary Griebenow, and his major professor, ant specialist Phil Ward. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sharing some fun are (from left) Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology; UC Davis doctoral student Zachary Griebenow, and his major professor, ant specialist Phil Ward. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sharing some fun are (from left) Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology; UC Davis doctoral student Zachary Griebenow, and his major professor, ant specialist Phil Ward. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Senior museum scientist Steve Heydon dressed in an orange jumpsuit, lettered in back
Senior museum scientist Steve Heydon dressed in an orange jumpsuit, lettered in back "Department of Corrections." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Senior museum scientist Steve Heydon dressed in an orange jumpsuit, lettered in back "Department of Corrections." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll, at 6'11
UC Davis evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll, at 6'11", towered over everyone. Next to him (in back) is his wife, entomologist Jenella Loye. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll, at 6'11", towered over everyone. Next to him (in back) is his wife, entomologist Jenella Loye. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's a cake without bugs? This is a close-up of the Bohart Museum of Entomology's 72nd anniversary cake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What's a cake without bugs? This is a close-up of the Bohart Museum of Entomology's 72nd anniversary cake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's a cake without bugs? This is a close-up of the Bohart Museum of Entomology's 72nd anniversary cake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey wields the knife to cut the anniversary cake. In back are guests Anita Heydon and Maria Nansen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey wields the knife to cut the anniversary cake. In back are guests Anita Heydon and Maria Nansen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey wields the knife to cut the anniversary cake. In back are guests Anita Heydon and Maria Nansen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey (center), Bohart Museum director, and Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator, serve cake to Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor of entomology who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lynn Kimsey (center), Bohart Museum director, and Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator, serve cake to Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor of entomology who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey (center), Bohart Museum director, and Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator, serve cake to Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor of entomology who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 29, 2018 at 3:56 PM
Focus Area Tags: Family Food Innovation

Hungry, Hungry Caterpillars!

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It starts out slow. Beginning in the spring (and sometimes year-around in some locales) Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) lay their eggs on their host plant, the passionflower vine (Passiflora). They deposit their eggs on the tendrils, on the leaves, and sometimes on the fence, wall or door...

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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