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Posts Tagged: Bohart Museum of Entomology

UC Davis/UC ANR Communicatiors Win ACE Awards

Bohart associate and entomology  student Wade Spencer (left) shows Chancellor Gary May and Dean Helene Dillard a stick insect from the Bohart Museum of Entomology's petting zoo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Insects played a key role in the recent awards announced by the international Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Life and Human Sciences (ACE). Five entomology-related entries from UC Davis won awards. They involved an administrative tour of the Bohart...

Bohart associate and entomology  student Wade Spencer (left) shows Chancellor Gary May and Dean Helene Dillard a stick insect from the Bohart Museum of Entomology's petting zoo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate and entomology student Wade Spencer (left) shows Chancellor Gary May and Dean Helene Dillard a stick insect from the Bohart Museum of Entomology's petting zoo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and entomology student Wade Spencer (left) shows Chancellor Gary May and Dean Helene Dillard a stick insect from the Bohart Museum of Entomology's petting zoo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image of a honey bee covered with mustard pollen won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This image of a honey bee covered with mustard pollen won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image of a honey bee covered with mustard pollen won a silver award in the ACE competition. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Birds, Bats or a Bloom? But No Splat!

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, ready to devour aphids, its primary food source. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Remember that massive green blob that showed up Tuesday night, June 4 on the National Weather Service (NWS) radar in San Diego, and NWS tweeted it was a “a cloud of ladybugs (termed a bloom)”? Wait! They may NOT have been ladybugs, scientifically known as lady beetles, family...

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, ready to devour aphids, its primary food source. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle, aka ladybug, ready to devour aphids, its primary food source. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, ready to devour aphids, its primary food source. Image taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle on the prowl in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle on the prowl in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle on the prowl in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers over a leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers over a leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-boo! A lady beetle peers over a leaf in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A congregation of overwintering lady beetles in California's Coast Range. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
A congregation of overwintering lady beetles in California's Coast Range. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

A congregation of overwintering lady beetles in California's Coast Range. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

European Carder Bees Do Like Snapdragons!

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a show! Last weekend we spotted female European wool carder bees (so named because they collect or card plant hairs for their nests) buzzing in and out of our snapdragons. The bees, about the size of honey bees, are mostly black and yellow. The females range in body length from 11 to 13...

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, June 6, 2019 at 5:08 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

A 'Star' Is Born and Then....

First-instar praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis praying mantis expert and entomology student Lohit Garikpati. Photograph taken May 13 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We rarely see an adult praying mantis until late summer or fall. Their offspring are out there, though. And sometimes we see life go full circle. On Sept. 23, 2018, we watched a Mama Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis entomology student and mantis expert Lohit Garikipati,...

First-instar praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis praying mantis expert and entomology student Lohit Garikpati. Photograph taken May 13 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
First-instar praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis praying mantis expert and entomology student Lohit Garikpati. Photograph taken May 13 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

First-instar praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis praying mantis expert and entomology student Lohit Garikpati. Photograph taken May 13 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How tiny is the first-instar? This tiny. And that's a red spider mite that crawled onto the dime. Note the chunk of abdomen missing on the first-instar--probably due to sibling cannibalism. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
How tiny is the first-instar? This tiny. And that's a red spider mite that crawled onto the dime. Note the chunk of abdomen missing on the first-instar--probably due to sibling cannibalism. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How tiny is the first-instar? This tiny. And that's a red spider mite that crawled onto the dime. Note the chunk of abdomen missing on the first-instar--probably due to sibling cannibalism. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was a very gravid mantis, Stagmomantis limbata on Sept. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This was a very gravid mantis, Stagmomantis limbata on Sept. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was a very gravid mantis, Stagmomantis limbata on Sept. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mama mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an ootheca or egg case on a redwood stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mama mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an ootheca or egg case on a redwood stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mama mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an ootheca or egg case on a redwood stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 3, 2019 at 7:12 PM

This Bug's for You--And That One, Too!

UC Davis entomology student and Bohart associate Lohit Garikipati shows butterfly specimens to Olivia Bingen, 4, and her father, Steve Bingen of the UC Davis Department of Music. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This bug's for you. And this one, too. And that one over there! When UC Davis employees and their offspring visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology during the recent "Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work" Day, reactions ranged from awe to "wow!" They held walking sticks (stick insects),...

UC Davis entomology student and Bohart associate Lohit Garikipati shows butterfly specimens to Olivia Bingen, 4, and her father, Steve Bingen of the UC Davis Department of Music. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology student and Bohart associate Lohit Garikipati shows butterfly specimens to Olivia Bingen, 4, and her father, Steve Bingen of the UC Davis Department of Music. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology student and Bohart associate Lohit Garikipati shows butterfly specimens to Olivia Bingen, 4, and her father, Steve Bingen of the UC Davis Department of Music. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It tickles! Camilla Fuerte, 7,  reacts to a tarantula as her brother Joel Fuerte, 10, takes it all in stride. They are the children of Gabby Sanchez Fuerte of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering. In the foreground is senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It tickles! Camilla Fuerte, 7, reacts to a tarantula as her brother Joel Fuerte, 10, takes it all in stride. They are the children of Gabby Sanchez Fuerte of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering. In the foreground is senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It tickles! Camilla Fuerte, 7, reacts to a tarantula as her brother Joel Fuerte, 10, takes it all in stride. They are the children of Gabby Sanchez Fuerte of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering. In the foreground is senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ilyssa Boco, first-year entomology student at UC Davis, shows stick insects to Camellia Aranda, 8, and her sister, Isabella, 4. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the Department of Political Science, and Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ilyssa Boco, first-year entomology student at UC Davis, shows stick insects to Camellia Aranda, 8, and her sister, Isabella, 4. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the Department of Political Science, and Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ilyssa Boco, first-year entomology student at UC Davis, shows stick insects to Camellia Aranda, 8, and her sister, Isabella, 4. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the Department of Political Science, and Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ximena Aranda, 6, and her sister, Isabella, 3, check out the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the UC Davis Department of Political Science and the Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ximena Aranda, 6, and her sister, Isabella, 3, check out the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the UC Davis Department of Political Science and the Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ximena Aranda, 6, and her sister, Isabella, 3, check out the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the UC Davis Department of Political Science and the Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and UC Davis graduate Emma Cluff shows tomato hornworms (Manduca quinquemaculata) to Isabella Aranda, 3, and her sister Ximena Aranda, 6. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate and UC Davis graduate Emma Cluff shows tomato hornworms (Manduca quinquemaculata) to Isabella Aranda, 3, and her sister Ximena Aranda, 6. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and UC Davis graduate Emma Cluff shows tomato hornworms (Manduca quinquemaculata) to Isabella Aranda, 3, and her sister Ximena Aranda, 6. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katie Eting, 6,  wearing a shirt,
Katie Eting, 6, wearing a shirt, "Girls Are Heroes" and her sister, Lily Eting, wearing "Every Day is Caturday," check out stick insects with their mother and UC Davis employee, Jennifer Eting (center) and Ilyssa Boco (far left), first-year entomology student. In back is Tabatha Yang, the Bohart Museum's education and outreach coordinator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katie Eting, 6, wearing a shirt, "Girls Are Heroes" and her sister, Lily Eting, wearing "Every Day is Caturday," check out stick insects with their mother and UC Davis employee, Jennifer Eting (center) and Ilyssa Boco (far left), first-year entomology student. In back is Tabatha Yang, the Bohart Museum's education and outreach coordinator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

McKenzie Kennedy, 8, granddaughter of UC Davis employee Sherly Blackshire, proudly holds a stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
McKenzie Kennedy, 8, granddaughter of UC Davis employee Sherly Blackshire, proudly holds a stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

McKenzie Kennedy, 8, granddaughter of UC Davis employee Sherly Blackshire, proudly holds a stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katie Eting, 6, and her mother Jennifer Eting learn about the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Katie Eting, 6, and her mother Jennifer Eting learn about the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katie Eting, 6, and her mother Jennifer Eting learn about the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

C. J. Babowal (center), 5, delights in seeing a stick insect on the arm of his brother, Roger Babowal, 9. At left is Katie Eting,6. The boys' mother, Crystal Babowal, works in UC Davis Continuing Education. Katie's mother, Jennifer Eting, works in Finance Operations and Administration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
C. J. Babowal (center), 5, delights in seeing a stick insect on the arm of his brother, Roger Babowal, 9. At left is Katie Eting,6. The boys' mother, Crystal Babowal, works in UC Davis Continuing Education. Katie's mother, Jennifer Eting, works in Finance Operations and Administration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

C. J. Babowal (center), 5, delights in seeing a stick insect on the arm of his brother, Roger Babowal, 9. At left is Katie Eting,6. The boys' mother, Crystal Babowal, works in UC Davis Continuing Education. Katie's mother, Jennifer Eting, works in Finance Operations and Administration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Camellia Aranda (foreground) likes a Madagascar hissing cockroach. In the background, Julianna “Ju Ju” Smith, 4, isn't so sure, as she hides behind the  her father, Justin Smith of Animal Science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Camellia Aranda (foreground) likes a Madagascar hissing cockroach. In the background, Julianna “Ju Ju” Smith, 4, isn't so sure, as she hides behind the her father, Justin Smith of Animal Science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Camellia Aranda (foreground) likes a Madagascar hissing cockroach. In the background, Julianna “Ju Ju” Smith, 4, isn't so sure, as she hides behind the her father, Justin Smith of Animal Science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Simon Dvorak, who works with UC Davis Academic Technology Services, visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his son Max, 7. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Simon Dvorak, who works with UC Davis Academic Technology Services, visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his son Max, 7. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Simon Dvorak, who works with UC Davis Academic Technology Services, visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his son Max, 7. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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