UCCE Sonoma County
University of California
UCCE Sonoma County

UC Agriculture & Natural Resources News

This Bug's for You--And That One, Too!

UC Davis entomology student and Bohart associate Lohit Garikipati shows butterfly specimens to Olivia Bingen, 4, and her father, Steve Bingen of the UC Davis Department of Music. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This bug's for you. And this one, too. And that one over there! When UC Davis employees and their offspring visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology during the recent "Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work" Day, reactions ranged from awe to "wow!" They held walking sticks (stick insects),...

UC Davis entomology student and Bohart associate Lohit Garikipati shows butterfly specimens to Olivia Bingen, 4, and her father, Steve Bingen of the UC Davis Department of Music. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology student and Bohart associate Lohit Garikipati shows butterfly specimens to Olivia Bingen, 4, and her father, Steve Bingen of the UC Davis Department of Music. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology student and Bohart associate Lohit Garikipati shows butterfly specimens to Olivia Bingen, 4, and her father, Steve Bingen of the UC Davis Department of Music. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It tickles! Camilla Fuerte, 7,  reacts to a tarantula as her brother Joel Fuerte, 10, takes it all in stride. They are the children of Gabby Sanchez Fuerte of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering. In the foreground is senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It tickles! Camilla Fuerte, 7, reacts to a tarantula as her brother Joel Fuerte, 10, takes it all in stride. They are the children of Gabby Sanchez Fuerte of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering. In the foreground is senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It tickles! Camilla Fuerte, 7, reacts to a tarantula as her brother Joel Fuerte, 10, takes it all in stride. They are the children of Gabby Sanchez Fuerte of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering. In the foreground is senior museum scientist Steve Heydon of the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ilyssa Boco, first-year entomology student at UC Davis, shows stick insects to Camellia Aranda, 8, and her sister, Isabella, 4. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the Department of Political Science, and Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ilyssa Boco, first-year entomology student at UC Davis, shows stick insects to Camellia Aranda, 8, and her sister, Isabella, 4. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the Department of Political Science, and Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ilyssa Boco, first-year entomology student at UC Davis, shows stick insects to Camellia Aranda, 8, and her sister, Isabella, 4. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the Department of Political Science, and Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ximena Aranda, 6, and her sister, Isabella, 3, check out the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the UC Davis Department of Political Science and the Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ximena Aranda, 6, and her sister, Isabella, 3, check out the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the UC Davis Department of Political Science and the Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ximena Aranda, 6, and her sister, Isabella, 3, check out the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Their mother, Laura Aranda, works with the administrative Orange Cluster, which serves the UC Davis Department of Political Science and the Department of Communication and Linguistics. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and UC Davis graduate Emma Cluff shows tomato hornworms (Manduca quinquemaculata) to Isabella Aranda, 3, and her sister Ximena Aranda, 6. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate and UC Davis graduate Emma Cluff shows tomato hornworms (Manduca quinquemaculata) to Isabella Aranda, 3, and her sister Ximena Aranda, 6. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and UC Davis graduate Emma Cluff shows tomato hornworms (Manduca quinquemaculata) to Isabella Aranda, 3, and her sister Ximena Aranda, 6. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katie Eting, 6,  wearing a shirt,
Katie Eting, 6, wearing a shirt, "Girls Are Heroes" and her sister, Lily Eting, wearing "Every Day is Caturday," check out stick insects with their mother and UC Davis employee, Jennifer Eting (center) and Ilyssa Boco (far left), first-year entomology student. In back is Tabatha Yang, the Bohart Museum's education and outreach coordinator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katie Eting, 6, wearing a shirt, "Girls Are Heroes" and her sister, Lily Eting, wearing "Every Day is Caturday," check out stick insects with their mother and UC Davis employee, Jennifer Eting (center) and Ilyssa Boco (far left), first-year entomology student. In back is Tabatha Yang, the Bohart Museum's education and outreach coordinator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

McKenzie Kennedy, 8, granddaughter of UC Davis employee Sherly Blackshire, proudly holds a stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
McKenzie Kennedy, 8, granddaughter of UC Davis employee Sherly Blackshire, proudly holds a stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

McKenzie Kennedy, 8, granddaughter of UC Davis employee Sherly Blackshire, proudly holds a stick insect. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katie Eting, 6, and her mother Jennifer Eting learn about the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Katie Eting, 6, and her mother Jennifer Eting learn about the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katie Eting, 6, and her mother Jennifer Eting learn about the insect specimens at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

C. J. Babowal (center), 5, delights in seeing a stick insect on the arm of his brother, Roger Babowal, 9. At left is Katie Eting,6. The boys' mother, Crystal Babowal, works in UC Davis Continuing Education. Katie's mother, Jennifer Eting, works in Finance Operations and Administration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
C. J. Babowal (center), 5, delights in seeing a stick insect on the arm of his brother, Roger Babowal, 9. At left is Katie Eting,6. The boys' mother, Crystal Babowal, works in UC Davis Continuing Education. Katie's mother, Jennifer Eting, works in Finance Operations and Administration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

C. J. Babowal (center), 5, delights in seeing a stick insect on the arm of his brother, Roger Babowal, 9. At left is Katie Eting,6. The boys' mother, Crystal Babowal, works in UC Davis Continuing Education. Katie's mother, Jennifer Eting, works in Finance Operations and Administration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Camellia Aranda (foreground) likes a Madagascar hissing cockroach. In the background, Julianna “Ju Ju” Smith, 4, isn't so sure, as she hides behind the  her father, Justin Smith of Animal Science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Camellia Aranda (foreground) likes a Madagascar hissing cockroach. In the background, Julianna “Ju Ju” Smith, 4, isn't so sure, as she hides behind the her father, Justin Smith of Animal Science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Camellia Aranda (foreground) likes a Madagascar hissing cockroach. In the background, Julianna “Ju Ju” Smith, 4, isn't so sure, as she hides behind the her father, Justin Smith of Animal Science. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Simon Dvorak, who works with UC Davis Academic Technology Services, visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his son Max, 7. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Simon Dvorak, who works with UC Davis Academic Technology Services, visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his son Max, 7. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Simon Dvorak, who works with UC Davis Academic Technology Services, visited the Bohart Museum of Entomology with his son Max, 7. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UCCE ag assistant Michael Yang is a lifeline for Hmong farmers

Long-time UC Cooperative Extension ag assistant Michael Yang broadcasts a weekly "Hmong Agriculture Radio Show," providing a crucial connection for immigrant farmers with ag information and services, reported Jessica Kutz in High Country News.

“His voice is really important,” said Ruth Dahlquist-Willard, UCCE advisor to small-scale farmers in Fresno and Tulare counties.

During his one-hour broadcast on KBIF radio, Yang plays traditional Hmong folk music, reads through market prices for Asian vegetables, provides timely farming advice, pesticide safety and labor information, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration updates. He started the program about 30 years ago.

“A lot of farmers said we need to be aware of what is going on,” he said. “So I talked to my boss and we were able to get some grants to help the radio announce agriculture (information) to the small farm community.” 

The article said Yang first tried to connect with the Hmong community by going door-to-door, but farmers were distrustful of government meddling. With their radios turned to programming in their native language, farmers listen openly.

UCCE agricultural assistant Michael Yang, left, and Van Thao snack on freshly picked melon during a field visit.
Posted on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 at 9:25 AM
Tags: Michael Yang (13)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

Hear That Buzz? It's World Bee Day!

Beekeeper Adelaide Grandia smiles through a pollinator cut-out board.  Her grandfather is teaching her beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hear that buzz? Today is World Bee Day! We celebrate honey bees every day, but they are especially celebrated on May 20, World Bee Day. It's an annual day to raise awareness about the importance of bees and beekeeping. It's a day to acknowledge the industriousness of Apis mellifera,  their...

Beekeeper Adelaide Grandia smiles through a pollinator cut-out board.  Her grandfather is teaching her beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beekeeper Adelaide Grandia smiles through a pollinator cut-out board. Her grandfather is teaching her beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeeper Adelaide Grandia smiles through a pollinator cut-out board. Her grandfather is teaching her beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Adelaide Grandia and her grandfather, Dwight Grandia of Gulf Shores, Ala., confer on a bee vacuum device. He is teaching her how to keep bees and recently set up a hive for her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Adelaide Grandia and her grandfather, Dwight Grandia of Gulf Shores, Ala., confer on a bee vacuum device. He is teaching her how to keep bees and recently set up a hive for her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Adelaide Grandia and her grandfather, Dwight Grandia of Gulf Shores, Ala., confer on a bee vacuum device. He is teaching her how to keep bees and recently set up a hive for her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier, who works in the chancellor and provost offices as manager of Budget and Financial Analyis, guides her twin daughters Casey and Gabrielle, 8, in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. The garden, located on Bee Biology Road, was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ariel Cormier, who works in the chancellor and provost offices as manager of Budget and Financial Analyis, guides her twin daughters Casey and Gabrielle, 8, in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. The garden, located on Bee Biology Road, was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier, who works in the chancellor and provost offices as manager of Budget and Financial Analyis, guides her twin daughters Casey and Gabrielle, 8, in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. The garden, located on Bee Biology Road, was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier shows her daughter, Gabrielle, how to use the bee vacuum device, a catch-and-release activity. At right is daughter Casey. The 8-year-old girls are twins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ariel Cormier shows her daughter, Gabrielle, how to use the bee vacuum device, a catch-and-release activity. At right is daughter Casey. The 8-year-old girls are twins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier shows her daughter, Gabrielle, how to use the bee vacuum device, a catch-and-release activity. At right is daughter Casey. The 8-year-old girls are twins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier with eight-year-old twin daughters Casey (left) and Gabrielle at the Miss Bee Haven sculpture. It's a six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture of a worker bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ariel Cormier with eight-year-old twin daughters Casey (left) and Gabrielle at the Miss Bee Haven sculpture. It's a six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture of a worker bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier with eight-year-old twin daughters Casey (left) and Gabrielle at the Miss Bee Haven sculpture. It's a six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture of a worker bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee David Hernandez (left) with sons Aayden, 10 (center) and Evan, 8, pose behind the pollinator cut-out board. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis employee David Hernandez (left) with sons Aayden, 10 (center) and Evan, 8, pose behind the pollinator cut-out board. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee David Hernandez (left) with sons Aayden, 10 (center) and Evan, 8, pose behind the pollinator cut-out board. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee Chunying Xu with her son, Andy, look for bees in the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis employee Chunying Xu with her son, Andy, look for bees in the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee Chunying Xu with her son, Andy, look for bees in the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Garbanzo bean production guide published for small but thriving industry

Rachael Long examines a garbanzo field in California for stand health.

Try topping your salads with some tasty garbanzo beans this summer. Not only are they a healthful source of protein, vitamins and minerals, but the ‘green' legumes are produced in California with a small environmental footprint!

California farmers grow about 10,000 acres of garbanzo beans, mostly for the canning market.

“We have the right growing conditions, including cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers, to produce high-quality, large, creamy-white garbanzo beans for high-end markets, like salad bars,” says Rachael Long, UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor for Sacramento, Solano and Yolo counties. “Other areas, such as Washington State, grow a smaller garbanzo bean destined for processing, like hummus, a creamy vegetable spread.”

Garbanzos, also called chickpeas, are originally from the Middle East, where they have been farmed since ancient times. In California, their heritage dates back to the Spanish Mission era. California garbanzo beans are grown in the winter time, minimizing water use. The nitrogen-fixing legumes supply their own nitrogen and require few pesticides for production as the plants secrete acids that ward off insect pests.

To assist farmers in production practices, Long led a team of researchers to produce a new 2019 Garbanzo (chickpea) production manual for the dry bean industry in California.

“This is a great resource for farmers and the industry,” says Nathan Sano, manager for the California Dry Bean Advisory Board, about the publication, which covers garbanzo production from seed selection to harvesting and markets.

The California garbanzo bean production manual is available for free online.

The manual identifies garbanzo varieties that have pest and disease resistance. Nutrient management information helps growers comply with regulations for protecting groundwater from nitrate. The irrigation section provides tables on water needs for crops grown in different areas of California, helping to conserve water.

“Our UC ANR Grain-Legume workgroup started this production manual back in 1992,” Long said. “I'm thankful for a strong team and grower and industry input and support. I also appreciate the incredible mentoring and reviews of this manual by Roland Meyer, UC Cooperative Extension emeritus soil specialist, and a fantastic editor, UC Cooperative Extension agronomy specialist Dan Putnam, to make this publication a reality. This was a big group effort, and I appreciate everyone's contributions to make this a valuable resource for the California dry bean industry.” 

The California garbanzo bean production manual is available for free online at https://anrcatalog.ucanr.edu/Details.aspx?itemNo=8634.

In addition to Long and Meyer, co-authors include UC Cooperative Extension farm advisors Michelle Leinfelder-Miles, Konrad Mathesius, Sarah Light, Mariano Galla, Shannon Mueller, Allan Fulton and Nick Clark, and UC Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist Khaled Bali.

Posted on Monday, May 20, 2019 at 3:01 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

UCCE lunchtime webinars to be offered during Invasive Species Action Week, June 3-7

When insects, animals, weeds and disease-causing microbes make their way into California from other parts of the nation or the world, the economic and environmental impacts can be catastrophic.

A recent UN report that details the world's biodiversity crisis assigns part of the blame to the proliferation of invasive alien species. “The numbers,” the report says, “have risen by about 70%, across the 21 countries with detailed records” since the 1970s.

“It's time to better understand how invasive species affect California's biodiversity, as well as our water supply, fire regimes, recreation and agriculture,” said Sabrina Drill, UC Cooperative Extension natural resources advisor in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. Drill worked with the California Invasive Plant Council and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to offer five free 40-minute mid-day webinars on invasive species as part of the multi-agency sponsored California Invasive Species Action Week.

During the first part of the week the series cover a range of organisms, from killer algae and incestuous beetles to rodents of unusual size. Later in the week, it's Weeds-A-Palooza, with talks focusing on invasive plants.

The webinars will be offered using Zoom Video Communications from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m June 3-7. All details are available online at https://ucanr.edu/sites/invasivelunch/invasivelunch2019/. Links to the Zoom meeting space will be posted on that webpage before the webinars begin.

In 2008, zebra mussels were found in San Justo Reservoir in central California and have not been observed in any other water body in California, Nevada or Oregon. (Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife)
Monday, June 3: “How they get here: Aquatic invasive species being moved around the world”

Sabrina Drill, UCCE natural resources advisor, and Edwin Grosholz, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, UC Davis 
Most people only hear about an invasive species when they are here causing problems. But preventing new invasive species from getting here in the first place requires understanding the “pathways” of introduction. From tsunamis to aquariums, container ships to canoes, Grosholz and Drill will discuss ways that freshwater and marine organisms travel to California, and how we can prevent spreading them once they arrive.

Tuesday, June 4: “What's killing California's trees? Shot hole borers, palm weevils and the rest”

Beatriz Nobua-Behrmann, urban forestry and natural resources advisor, UC Cooperative Extension in Orange County
Tree pests come to Golden State from around the world and threaten street trees, agriculture, and natural areas. Last year the legislature in Sacramento allocated $5 million to begin addressing the latest threat – shot hole borers that kill a wide variety of trees in Southern California. Nobua-Behrmann will describe how these insects damage trees and what we can do about it.

Nutria, native to South America, have been found in Central California near permanent water sources, such as rivers, streams, lakes, ponds and wetlands.
Wednesday, June 5: “Rodents of unusual size: Nutria in the Delta”

Valerie Cook-Fletcher, Nutria Eradication Incident Commander, California Department of Fish and Wildlife
Nutria, a South American rodent, have caused extensive damage in Louisiana wetlands for decades. Now nutria have been found in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and its tributaries and state agencies are working to find them before they can breed and spread. Cook-Fletcher will provide an update on efforts to locate this elusive swimmer in the maze of sloughs and backwaters of California's San Joaquin Valley.

Thursday, June 6: “Citizen stewardship: Tackling giant reed in Contra Costa County”

Mike Anciaux and Bob Simmons, Walnut Creek Watershed Council
Giant reed (Arundo donax) is one of the most damaging wildland weeds in California. More than $20 million was spent to remove it from the Santa Ana River watershed in Southern California to protect the endangered Least Bell's Vireo, a songbird that nests in native streamside vegetation. On the eastern side of San Francisco Bay, citizens are uniting to find and remove hundreds of populations along Contra Costa County's creeks.

Japanese knotweed. (Photo: National Park Service)
Friday, June 7: “Organizing to stop one of the world's worst weeds: Marin Knotweed Task Force”

Eric Wrubel, San Francisco Bay Area Network, National Park Service
Invasive knotweed species are some of the worst weeds in the world. They have become notorious for destroying property values in Europe. Knotweed is extremely difficult to get rid of because its underground rhizomes store energy and resist herbicides. Wrubel will describe the partnership that has formed to eradicate recently found invasive knotweed in the San Geronimo Valley and Lagunitas Creek watersheds in Marin County before it can spread.

Posted on Monday, May 20, 2019 at 8:56 AM
Focus Area Tags: Pest Management

First storyPrevious 5 stories  |  Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 

University of California Cooperative Extension, Sonoma County
133 Aviation Blvd Suite 109, Santa Rosa, CA 95403  Phone: 707.565.2621  Fax: 707.565.2623
Office Hours:  M-F, 8am-Noon & 1pm-4pm

Like us on Facebook: UCCE Sonoma                        Follow us on Twitter @UCCESonoma 

Webmaster Email: klgiov@ucanr.edu