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Scholarship for weed control offered by UC ANR

UC ANR

April 26, 2017 Contact: Pam Kan-Rice, (510) 206-3476, pam.kanrice@ucanr.edu Three agriculture scholarships offered by UC ANR Three scholarships are being offered to college students majoring in agriculture by the University of California's Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. The...

Posted on Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 8:00 AM

There's a Black Widow Spider in the Parade!

UC Davis Entomology Club members with the black widow spider float are (from left) Darian Dungey, James Fong, Chloe Shott (partially shown), Ben Maples (partially shown) James Heydon,   Maia Lundy, Diego Rivera. Lundy is the president of the club. (Photo by Melissa Cruz)

The venomous black widow spider (Latrodectus hesperus) is usually found in and around wood piles, beneath stones and rubble, and in cluttered areas of basements, sheds and garages. It can strike fear in the hearts of non-biologists. Sometimes it's found in a parade, where the "fear" turns to...

Posted on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 5:32 PM

Butte® registration approved for 2017 rice season

Early BUTTE® trials at the Rice Experiment Station, 2012

From the UC Rice Blog ι April 25, 2017 BUTTE®, a rice herbicide, has received federal registration in the USA and will be available to California rice growers for the upcoming 2017 season. Gowan Company, along with SDS Biotech and Nissan have collaborated to...

Posted on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 10:04 AM
Tags: herbicide (39), herbicide resistance (75), Rice (31), Weeds (45)

Three agriculture scholarships offered by UC ANR

Rob Wilson describes a potato variety trial at Intermountain Research and Extension Center.

Three scholarships are being offered by the University of California's Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources  to college students majoring in agriculture. The scholarships will be awarded for the fall 2017 semester or quarter. The deadline to apply or nominate for the scholarships is May 19, 2017.

KNOWLES A. RYERSON AWARD IN AGRICULTURE

Amount:  $2500 – two awarded each year, one each at Berkeley and Davis

The Knowles A. Ryerson Award in Agriculture is awarded annually to a foreign undergraduate student in a college of agriculture at UC Berkeley and UC Davis, in any curriculum, preferably after completion of the junior year. Students must be nominated by UC faculty or academic advisors. The $2,500 award is made on the basis of high scholarship, outstanding character and promise of leadership. One recipient will be selected from the Berkeley campus and one from the Davis campus.

HOWARD WALTON CLARK PRIZE IN PLANT BREEDING AND SOIL BUILDING

Amount:  $5,000 – one awarded each year

The Howard Walton Clark Prize in Plant Breeding and Soil Building is given to a senior student in a college of agriculture at UC Berkeley, UC Davis or UC Riverside who seems to show the greatest promise. Students must be nominated by UC faculty or academic advisors. Selection for the $5,000 scholarship is based on high scholastic achievement, talent for independent research and other characteristics, with particular reference to either plant breeding (leading to new/improved crops and new/improved varieties using appropriate tools) or soil building (leading to improving soil quality related to soil productivity and sustainability as a resource).

BILL AND JANE FISCHER VEGETATION MANAGEMENT SCHOLARSHIP

Amount: $1,000 – one awarded each year

The $1,000 Bill and Jane Fischer Vegetation Management Scholarship will be given to promising students with demonstrated interest in vegetation management (weed control) careers. Students from any accredited California university are eligible, with preference given to graduate students. The recipient will have an academic major and emphasis in one of the following areas (listed in order of preference): 

  • Vegetation management in agricultural crop production;
  • Plant science with emphasis on vegetation management in horticultural crops, agronomic or vegetable crops;
  • Soils and plant nutrition with emphasis on field, vegetable crop relationships;
  • Agricultural engineering with emphasis on developing tools for vegetation management;
  • Agricultural botany with emphasis on weed biology and weed ecology;
  • Plant pathology with emphasis on integrated vegetation management;
  • Plant protection and pest management with emphasis on field, vegetable, or horticultural crop relationships; or
  • Agricultural economics with emphasis on vegetation management in field, vegetable or horticultural crops.

For more information about the scholarships and nomination and application processes, visit http://ucanr.edu/Development_services/Awards_and_scholarships.

 

Posted on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 9:45 AM
Tags: scholarships (1)

Rainbow of potential alternative pomegranate varieties

Almost all pomegranates grown in the United States are one variety: Wonderful. John Chater, a Ph.D. student at the University of California, Riverside, wants to change that.

He would like to broaden the varieties of pomegranates available so that someone going to a supermarket can, like apples, buy varieties of pomegranates that vary in sweetness, seed hardness, flavor profile and color.

With that in mind, he has spent the last four years researching the commercial potential of 13 pomegranate varieties, and also started breeding new types of pomegranates.

He has field trials set up in Riverside and Somis, just east of Ventura, so he can evaluate the difference between coastal and inland climates. He has also chemically analyzed the juice of the varieties for quality.

Preliminarily, Chater, who is a 2016 University of California Global Food Initiative student fellow, has identified seven pomegranate varieties that have commercial juice potential. Three of them – Blaze, Phoenicia, and Purple Heart – were developed by his grandfather, who was a mechanic at a hospital but developed a cult following among fruit growers in California for developing new varieties of pomegranates.

Here are some of the pluses and minuses of each variety compared to Wonderful: 

Al Sirin Nar: Large fruit, with hard seeds, soft peel, and large arils. With its sweet-tart juice, it could be useful for juice applications. Seeds may be too hard to be sold as a whole fruit.

Blaze: Medium sized fruit, juice more sweet than tart. Fruit similar to Wonderful. Could serve coastal and inland growers. Has potential to be sold as a whole fruit.

Desertnyi: Soft-seeded, medium sized fruit with ornamental quality. Delicious balanced flavor that has been described as citrus-like. Trees seem to may need trellis or rootstocks for commercial production. Has potential to be sold as a whole fruit.

Parfianka: Soft seeded variety with sweet-tart to sweet flavor. Very precocious in the field and on both inland and on the coast. This variety is an international favorite for its refreshing flavor and soft seeds. Has potential to be sold as a whole fruit.

Phoenicia: Large fruit with medium to hard seeds. Fruit multicolored with yellow, pink, and reds. Sweet-tart flavor with a tartness that consumers enjoy. Fruit seems to keep well in storage.

Purple Heart: Medium-sized red fruit that has dark red juice and arils. Fruit and juice similar to ‘Wonderful'. Sold as ‘Sharp Velvet' at Dave Wilson Nursery.

Sakerdze: Large fruit, with hard seeds, soft peel, and large arils. Juice is sweet to sweet tart. Fruit can be pinkish to red.

Posted on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 8:47 AM
Tags: pomegranate (12)

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